Artificial Intelligence Making A Number Of Industries Safer, Not Just Vehicles

Most of us know exactly how scary a car accident can be. This is especially true when someone is injured in the collision. Arriving authorities, paramedics included, must often administer immediate treatments after making a diagnosis — and rarely is there any time at all to hesitate. Because there is so little time when lives are in the balance, misdiagnosis of injuries after a car accident is a common form of medical malpractice.

We know the story here at home, but how about abroad? It turns out the statistics are very familiar: The European Commission of Mobility and Transport acknowledged that about 44 percent of car accident-related fatalities might not have occurred had reliable and accurate information been recorded directly after the accident.

Believe it or not, most fatalities that result from car accidents don’t actually occur at the scene of the accident — they occur either in transport to the hospital, at the hospital, or even at home. The ECMT said about 32 percent of recorded car accident fatalities occurred when victims were transported to the wrong hospital for their injuries, while 12 percent died because no information was available at all.

That’s where artificial intelligence comes into play.

Machine learning has grown exponentially over the last few years, and is expected to grow at the same or greater rate for decades longer. 

A company called MDGo founded by Dr. Itay Bengad, Eli Zerah, and Gilad Avrashi last year is combining artificial intelligence and machine learning technology with healthcare, especially in the niche of car accidents. MDGo is using a predictive technology using sensors that already exist on new vehicles.

These sensors would automatically provide doctors and surgeons with real-time information on the nature of the car accident and the likely injuries sustained by passengers at the time of the crash. The report includes damage to the vehicle — but more importantly it will provide specific information about the injuries sustained, such as type of injury and severity. 

The information will also help first responders and coordinators make better decisions about where to send patients for the most accurate treatment possible. In the future, it is likely the MDGo tech will be combined with driverless vehicles to provide even more information about the circumstances related to the car accident.

The AI is expected to reduce car accident-related fatalities both short- and long-term, while also slashing healthcare expenses for those who need post-accident care. Better yet, the system should reduce the number of lawsuits that result from these accidents.