What Kind Of New Technology Can Help Prevent Car Accidents?

New technology is saving lives, but you might not have heard about it. Part of the reason is because a lot of the new technologies involved aren’t as flashy as Tesla’s autopilot or the full automation that Google and Uber are beginning to employ in new vehicles. A chief research officer at the U.S. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, David Zuby, thinks that these systems might do more to prevent injuries and deaths than seatbelts or airbags ever could. Here are a few of the newest systems.

  • Electronic Stability Control (ESC). This system is now mandatory in Canada because it helps stop out of control vehicles even in inclement weather. ESC slashes engine power and brakes individual wheels one at a time rather than all at once. The technology has resulted in a nearly 50 percent fatality rate reduction since it was implemented.
  • Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB). This system can prevent the common fender bender, which we’ve probably all experienced at least once by the time we’re a few decades old. They’re the most common type of car accident, but AEB prevents nearly half of them from occurring. When it fails, it still blunts the impact enough to slash injury rate by another half.
  • Blind Spot Warning. Most newer cars will alert you when another vehicle enters your blind spot. The warning light usually flashes red on your side mirrors. Other blind spot warning systems will send a vibration through your steering wheel when a car is detected–but only if you’re trying to make a lane change. The technology cuts accidents by about 14 percent.
  • Other Warnings. Some vehicles will let you know when your car is drifting out of its lane by vibrating the steering wheel or flashing a light. Some will automatically steer you back into the right lane. Other systems will alert the driver when another car is to the side or behind them when backing out of a parking space.

While these new systems certainly help reduce the number of dangers we face on the streets, they don’t eliminate them. In fact, there is some evidence that suggests some drivers will drive more recklessly because of these new safety systems. Be wary while on the road!

Who’s Liable If An Open Car Door Is Hit?

True story: I was driving to work this morning when the truck in front of me took off the door of a car parked next to the sideway. This made me curious. Who is at fault? I can’t believe the woman opened her car door when there was clearly a huge truck heading in her direction but I also can’t believe the truck hit the door – he didn’t even attempt to slow down. He then pulled over and got out of the truck while I continued forward and went to work. But now I’m wondering how does one even put in a claim for this type of accident.

The answer is a resounding “it depends.” Most of the time it is the person opening the car door who is the one who is at fault. The person driving was following all traffic laws (maybe he was speeding but so was everyone else on the road). He could not have been aware that the person would open the door, therefore, he cannot be responsible or any damage sustained to her car door or to his car. There a ton of traffic laws that state a variation of the following: no person shall open the door of a vehicle on the side available to moving traffic unless it is reasonably safe to do so.

However, that doesn’t fully get the truck driver off the hook. As I said, he might have been speeding which might be held against him. The woman could have thought she had the safety time to open her door but because he was driving so fast she didn’t have as much time as she thought. Also, I just saw the truck hit the door if the door was opened he should have seen it and had ample time to adjust his driving, therefore, making him at fault for the accident.

I will keep wondering what happens…

Who Is Liable For An Accident Due To Brake Failure?

Being in a car accident is scary, especially when its due to brake failure. Losing control of the car and crashing into something can cause serious injury to you, passengers and other drivers. When this happens to you, it might seem like you are liable for any damages. However, that’s not the case.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) survey on motor vehicle accidents, around 2% of accidents are caused solely by issues with the vehicle itself, such as brake failure. This figure encompasses two primary categories: manufacturing defects and design defects. The former refers to an automotive defect resulting from a poor manufacturing job in the factory. Typically, this will be a more isolated incident than one stemming from a design defect. Contrarily, if there is an issue with the car’s design, all of the cars matching that model and year are likely affected.

In order for an attorney to demonstrate that the manufacturer is liable for the accident, the issue with the brakes must be proven unreasonably dangerous. Further, this defect must be shown to be a direct cause of the injury. Often, such defects result in rear-end collisions with another vehicle. One important factor in determining liability in such accidents is driver negligence. Were the brakes really defective, or was the driver distracted and not paying attention to the road? Was the driver aware of their vehicle’s poor condition, or was it a surprise failure?

If the brakes can be shown to be faulty by an impartial mechanic shortly after the accident, an attorney can likely help you sue the vehicle’s manufacturer. In some cases, the car dealership or a mechanic can be liable as well. However, if the driver is proven to have been distracted, these claims are no longer viable and they must assume liability. Similarly, if the driver was aware of the poor condition of their vehicle before taking it on the road, they will be liable a result of negligence.

Often, in collisions due to brake failure, the liability is split between both parties. It is common for both drivers to have been acting recklessly and even illegally before the accident occurred. For example, one driver may have been going over the speed limit when crossing an intersection, failing to hit the brakes in time and hitting another car who was running a red light. Both drivers were acting unsafely, and thus would both share the liability for this accident.

In any regard, accidents involving or claiming to involve vehicle defects are complex situations centered around product liability law. To best protect yourself, contact an experienced auto accidents attorney to assist with your case.

Will I be Held Liable if my Car was Stolen and in an Accident?

Unfortunately, car accidents happen every day. They can be a tragic event involving fatalities or as small as a tiny dent on a bumper. Regardless, all car accidents should be reported to the police and the respective drivers’ insurance companies.

The only thing worse than being in a car accident yourself, is if your car is stolen and involved in an accident. Not only do you have to deal with the stress that comes along with a stolen vehicle, but you have to deal with the stress of your car being in an accident.

What Are Your Responsible For?

Well, first off, when you discover that your car was stolen, you should:

Call the Police: Tell the police all about your car. Let them know that it has been stolen, the make, model, color, license plate, and any other important information.

Call your insurance company: After you call the police, the next step is to call your insurance company. In case anything happens with the vehicle, you should document that the vehicle was stolen.

Are You Liable?

If your car has been stolen and has been involved in an accident, you will not be held liable. The reasoning behind this ruling is that you did not willfully lend your car out to someone.

Tips to Prevent Vehicle Theft

The first step to avoiding a situation like this is to take steps to ensure the security of your vehicle. Some tips to prevent auto theft are:

  • Have a security system installed
  • Try not to park in high crime areas
  • Avoid dark, shady areas
  • Purchase auto theft insurance

Contact a Car Accident Attorney

If you, or your vehicle, has been in a car accident, the next best step after alerting the authorities is to contact an experienced car accident attorney. A car accident attorney will investigate your case and decide whether or not you will be held liable. In the case that you are injured in the said crash, a car accident attorney will file a lawsuit.