The Most Common Types Of Motorcycle Accident Injuries

It’s probably not a surprise to anyone that there are a far greater number of motorcycle accident injuries than automobile accident injuries. Bikes aren’t nearly as safe as motor vehicles or trucks, and that can only be compounded by the thrill-seeking personality of most motorcyclists. Insurance premiums for these vehicles are often more expensive not only because of the number of accidents, but also because of how catastrophic they usually are.

Here are a few of the most common types of motorcycle accident injuries:

Road Rash. Have you ever had a really bad rug burn? A terrible noogie? Well, road rash is indescribably worse. When your bike tips and slides at high speeds, you’ll suffer from road rash. At that point you may have been flung away from the bike and started to rub against the pavement all by yourself. No protective gear or clothing is enough to prevent the skin loss that results.

The injury is often made worse by subsequent irritation, inflammation, and infection. Hopefully you won’t need skin grafts.

Muscle. Doctors and surgeons will often notice muscle damage after motorcycle accidents. If an accident leaves you paralyzed, your muscles will start to wither away. Any major injury will require physical therapy in order to build you back up to where you were before the accident.

Don’t forget about the loud sounds of the roadways–wear earplugs or buy a helmet that protects your ears in order to prevent bursting eardrums of an increased chance of deafness later in life.

Legs and Arms. When you fall–this is after the road rash but before the muscle damage becomes permanent–you’ll likely experience damage to the leg and arm on the side of the impact. Broken or shattered bones are commonplace, or perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to experience only scrapes and lacerations.

Biker’s arm occurs because of the instinctual reaction to being flung from a high-speed vehicle. When you place your hands and arms in front of your face, you won’t just suffer from broken bones–you’ll suffer from nerve damage.

Other. You’re also prone to permanent disfigurement, amputation, paralysis, and traumatic brain injury (or TBI). About ten percent of individuals who experience TBI cannot live on their own after the accident because of permanent neurological damage. Be sure to wear a helmet when you’re on the road!